Lesson Five. Get people to ask why

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IMG_1461Why is this stunt important at all? Why not just give up if it is too difficult in the face of another setback?

The universal response is that the stunt captures people’s imagination. The fact that it is difficult and we are now facing further setbacks is part of the narrative that captures the imagination. If we were to give up now, what would that say about our conviction that change is possible to improve the delivery of child survival?

The first question people always ask when the stunt is explained is: “why?”

This is a very important question for people to ask for opening a conversation. It is a question asking for motive. Through explaining the stunt, I have opened countless conversations about improving child survival because people are drawn to ask why I am doing the runs. Admittedly, a more substantial conversation is needed to improve the delivery of child survival, and this will be achieved through the series of Design Forum.

Many conversations are with people who have never really given much thought to the issue about child survival. Other conversations have enabled engagement with a thriving community of people already engaged in addressing issues related to child survival. Through generating interest from this stunt, the 10 City Bridge Run seeks to bridge these two groups during the series of Design Forum.

Opening the conversation is critical to having impact. The photo-essay of human bridges featured in the book ‘Life Bridge’ which crowdfunding to date has helped fund will further open this conversation as a segue between the running stunt and the Design Forum which follow. But first, we have to allow people to ask why.

Lesson Four. Lead by example by learning

Lesson Six. Take the pressure off and change the conversation

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3 thoughts on “Lesson Five. Get people to ask why

    […] Lesson Three. The view from the other side is better, but you won’t know until you get there Lesson Five. Get people to ask why […]

    Nine Lessons From An Epic Journey « Building Bridges said:
    November 6, 2014 at 6:46 pm

    […] Lesson Five. Get people to ask why. […]

    […] Lesson Five. Get people to ask why […]

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